DEMENTIA

As medicine advances, it prolongs life where nature would have followed its natural cycle a while ago. Whilst the NHS sees it as a goal to keep people alive for as long as it can, the NHS wants very little of the responsibility for this artificial situation it creates and is determined to maintain.

The responsibility usually falls onto or is pushed onto a close relative – who is not trained, assisted or often completely able to cope with it.

Then there can be another problem: When someone undergoes a powerful trauma, their personality can fragment, temporarily leaving behind a smaller part. The larger part rejoins after the event but because the smaller part had a different experience, it cannot be reintegrated and remains separate. Some people refer to this part as the Inner Child because this most often happens in childhood. It can happen at any age and can happen any number of times. This is one thing and can be dealt with and resolved.

However, in dementia, as parts of the brain die due to TIAs (Transient Ischaemic Attacks) there can come a time when the physical brain cannot support all of the personality. The personality does not consciously fragment at this point, parts of it just break off or fall off because there is nowhere for them to stay, any more.

Having just lost their home, they will likely seek a new one and a good place is with an open, caring person whom the dementia suffers knows. If this happens, the carer can feel overwhelmed by their charge, they can feel that there is an influence on them from which they can see no way out. They wonder how anyone can have such a hold over them, governing their life. The carer can feel helpless, desperate and see no future, they may or may not recognise that they have quite a degree of depression and that their life is now miserable.

If this is you, another website of mine might interest you: www.dementiacare-newdirection.co.uk