I just wanted to thank you for helping me with my phobia. Before now, I never thought I could walk past a **** without being terrified. However, after the last session there were two ****s only feet away from me. Unbelievably, I walked past without a single concern. I could not believe how it happened and neither did my family but it did and I am so happy to finally feel comfortable with ****s. So, thank you.

Alexa

When I have fallen, you have been there, every time, to pick me up... You have been like a guardian angel whom I have been lucky enough to bump into. 

Kate

Things get better day by day.

Liz

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Hypnotherapy in Oakham and Rutland, Stamford and Leicester for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder:

CBT in Oakham and Rutland, Stamford and Leicester for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder:

Hypnotherapy in Oakham and Rutland, Stamford and Leicester for PTSD:

CBT in Oakham and Rutland, Stamford and Leicester for PTSD:

You may be the person with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) but you are likely to be the spouse or a close relative of someone with PTSD. This is because most people with PTSD know something is wrong but have no idea or way of calibrating how far from their normal self they are. They have been affected by some awful event that placed demands on them which were beyond their ability to cope with. It is not their fault. The main symptoms are listed below; different people suffer from different symptoms and different numbers of them. This list is a guide.

Post Traumatic Distress Disorder Symptoms:

  • Re-experiencing – flashbacks, nightmares, intrusive and distressing images.
  • Avoidance – avoiding people, situations or circumstances reminding you of the experience.
  • Hyper arousal – hyper vigilance for a repeat or threat of a repeat experience, exaggerated startle response, sleep problems, irritability, poor concentration.
  • Emotional numbing – lack of ability to feel emotions, feeling detached from other people, withdrawing from previously significant activities, amnesia for significant parts of the experience.
  • Depression – something has happened which you did not want to happen or something has not happened which you did want to happen. The result is that you have a reduction or loss of ability to find pleasure in your life.
  • Drug or alcohol misuse or abuse – this may seem like the only escape.
  • Anger – of course you are angry; not only has something terrible happened but you were not able to do anything about it.
  • Unexplained physical symptoms – you may repeatedly visit your GP with a physical problem they are unable to diagnose or treat successfully.
  • A belief that it can happen again.
  • No sense of the future – you are frozen so solidly in time that, for you, now is so enormous that there is no future.
  • Choosing safety – you may do things like cancel a taxi or an appointment at the last minute, just in case.
  • Inability to describe your feelings – the part of the brain responsible for words and speech shuts down during such an experience. You truly do not have any words to describe what you experienced.

One of the most common symptoms is the cancelling of things at the last minute. This is because of the belief that it can happen again and choosing safety. Some people go through the rest of their lives with PTSD and don’t know it because they think you have to suffer terrible injury, like a soldier stepping on a mine, to have PTSD. You can have PTSD after a car crash, divorce, bereavement, job loss or anything that overwhelmed you at the time.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment:

RAF Group Captain Richard Castle, PhD, is a psychiatrist who has treated PTSD in RAF personnel for some years. He was involved in a train crash near a petrol station which ignited in a fireball, setting fire to the carriages, where he was injured and trapped. As the fire burned along the train, it reached his carriage and several people ahead of him burned to death before he was rescued. He came out with PTSD. Now someone who treated PTSD saw it from the inside and he knew better what to do to treat it. His methods make him a world authority on treating PTSD and he is asked to chair world conferences on PTSD – such is the respect for him and his methods.

He has taught me his methods and I use them to help people suffering from PTSD to come back home – to themselves and their families; they come back to life.

Living with PTSD v Living without PTSD:

You you don’t have to live with PTSD, you don’t need to live with PTSD. It doesn’t matter what anyone else has done that didn’t work or what anyone else has told you that didn’t work – you can be freed from its hold over your life. I can help you.